How To Make A Multilingual Wood Welcome Sign

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I’m finally posting my first project of 2013! Hoooray, it’s about time! I’ve been working on my winter front porch for a while now, and I keep running into road blocks, so I thought I’d share the Multilingual Welcome Sign I made using a piece of scrap plywood I found in the garage. I love recycled projects!

Today, you’ll find a tutorial on how to make a multilingual wood welcome sign using scrap wood, dark walnut stain, white paint and a stencil!

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I happen to have a slight obsession with mixing crisp white with wood (proof of that can be found here, here, here and here).  And I love how this one turned out. Expect to see more of this look from me this year!

How To Make A Multi-Lingual Wood Welcome Sign, diy welcome sign, two tone welcome signs, welcome subway art, multi-lingual signs, white and dark stain wood

I’ve been searching online for the perfect subway art for a while and when I came across this multi-lingual welcome art on the Silhouette Store I just fell in love. The graphic work is beautiful and I adore how the languages are in a different font. I think it will be the perfect addition to the front porch as it welcomes everyone!

How To Make A Multi-Lingual Wood Welcome Sign, diy welcome sign, two tone welcome signs, welcome subway art, multi-lingual signs, white and dark stain wood

Ready for a quick tutorial?

How To Make A Multi-Lingual Wood Welcome Sign, diy welcome sign, two tone welcome signs, welcome subway art, multi-lingual signs, white and dark stain wood

I started with a piece of scrap plywood that I found in our garage. Mine measures 23″ X 11″.

I stained it with one coat of Dark Walnut by Rustoleum. I only used one coat because I wanted to see the variations in the wood grain.

Next, I used my Silhouette to cut out the subway art onto vinyl. You’ll want to use a 24″ cutting mat for this. I don’t have one so I had to piece it together, I don’t recommend it.

Now here we go into lots of flip-flopping…

Peel off the excess vinyl so the subway art is the only thing left on the backing.

Then, apply the transfer paper on top of the art.

How To Make A Multi-Lingual Wood Welcome Sign, diy welcome sign, two tone welcome signs, welcome subway art, multi-lingual signs, white and dark stain wood

Turn it over and peel off the vinyl backing.

Place the transfer paper with the subway art onto the stained piece of wood (after it is dry). Press firmly transfer paper onto the wood and get all of the bubbles out.

Carefully pull back the transfer paper to reveal the subway art. *Note: VERY carefully pull back the paper, VERY slowly. Some of my vinyl started to slip so I had to peel it off the transfer paper in a few spots. You’ll need to take your time on this step.

If your vinyl is secure to the surface you can probably skip this step, but I applied a clear layer of Mod Podge on top of the vinyl to help keep it in place and prevent any paint from bleeding.

Lastly, I applied two coats of white latex paint that I had left over in my garage.

Let it dry overnight and then carefully pull off the vinyl letters to reveal the wood beneath.

And you are finished! C’est fini!

How To Make A Multi-Lingual Wood Welcome Sign, diy welcome sign, two tone welcome signs, welcome subway art, multi-lingual signs, white and dark stain wood

 Thanks for stopping by today :)

Linking to some of the parties here along with Today’s Creative BlogTipJunkieHome Stories A 2 Z, Funky Junk Interiors, The Shabby NestMy Repurposed LifeThe Shabby Creek CottageThrifty Decor Chick, Serenity Now, Centsational Girl

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About 

Taryn is the owner/editor of Design, Dining and Diapers, a lifestyle blog that focuses primarily on DIY home decor, seasonal crafts, easy recipes and just being a mom! She is all about making things for less by upcycling thrift store finds, using what’s on hand and transforming dollar store finds. Taryn lives in the greater Seattle area with her husband, 2 year old daughter and newborn son.

Comments

  1. Carrie Rollins says

    Hey Taryn!

    I just ADORE this sign! I’m dying to make one now! I did have a question though….I have been wanting to buy a silhouette machine for a while now and just don’t have any idea of what is a good kind/brand/model to get. What would you suggest?

  2. says

    Very cute! You’ve got to buy the Cricut 24″ mat – it seriously saves SO much time and is only like $12 for 2!! (or maybe it was $12 each – I can’t remember). :)

  3. JaneEllen says

    You are such a master Taryn, Love that subway art, do you get the silhouette to make the different fonts also? It looks great, what a wonderful sign to have on your porch or wherever you hang it.
    I tried making some subway art by using a stencil for the words but just couldn’t get the spacing right no matter how hard I tried, let alone not being able to vary the font or sizing of the letters.
    My subway art sign is out on deck getting warped now with all the snow and dampness. I decided I should stick with things I know how to do.
    I might tackle it again in the summer when I can work on it outside. Don’t really have the proper work space to tackle in the house as we don’t have a basement or garage. We have to work on our deck. The possibility of buying a silhouette is not in the bank balance. I’ll stick to things I can do without so much frustration. After painting over the mistakes/screw ups I was ready to throw that board out thru the back door this past summer, lol Have a great 2013

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